Resources for the Press

Click on each section below to reveal the information.

SECTION 1: Media Kit and Press Releases

Media Kit

Press Releases

SECTION 2: News and Editorial Coverage

What is a Little Free Library?

First, Little Free Library is the name of a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighborhood book exchanges around the world.

The organization helps people around the world start and maintain free “take a book, share a book” book exchanges called Little Free Libraries.  Most Little Free Libraries are placed in front yards, parks, gardens and easily accessible locations. The Libraries are built to withstand weather of all kinds and hold 20-100 books. Some Libraries are located in coffee shops, in or near restaurants and community centers.

Originally designed to look like a one-room school or a “house of books,” the Libraries rapidly took on a wide variety of sizes, shapes, themes, and other attributes. There is no standard size and shape. Although many businesses and apartments may have had book-sharing shelves for years, the idea of a network of unique structure with stewards, signage, and social support began in 2010.

To be officially called a Little Free Library, a free book exchange must be registered with an official charter sign and charter number.

How many Little Free Libraries are there?
As of August 2018, there are more than 75,000 registered Little Free Libraries in all 50 states and 88 countries. Please see our map for more information.

The organization:
Little Free Library is a nonprofit organization that inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighborhood book exchanges around the world.

The Little Free Library movement:
People worldwide have embraced the idea of Little Free Libraries and in our Hudson, Wisconsin, headquarters, we’re working to strengthen and support them with effective communication channels, programs, events, and partnerships that build on our mission.

How to describe Little Free Library book exchanges:
The correct legal name is three words: Little Free Library. To distinguish between Little Free Libraries and public libraries in the generic sense, most writers capitalize the proper name. Only registered Little Free Library book exchanges may use the title “Little Free Library”; if a book exchange is not registered, it is simply called a book exchange. It is permissible to use the term Little Libraries or just Libraries when referring to any registered Little Free Library book exchange.

SECTION 3: Little Free Library Logos, Trademarks and Service Marks

Little Free Library and/or its affiliates claim(s) statutory and/or common law rights in and to the following trademarks and service marks: Little Free Library and its common variations.

Use this form to request permission to use our logo and marks.
Please read our Terms and Conditions before downloading and using our logo and marks.

SECTION 4: Little Free Library Photos

The following photos may be used for third-party articles about Little Free Library (click the link to view each photo):

Library #6315, Traverse City, Michigan

Library #6247, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Library #2621, Mountlake Terrace, Washington

Libraries #7331 and #7332, Rivne, Ukraine

Library #10883, Mount Martha, Victoria, Australia

Library #6357, Sandy Springs, Georgia

Library #31486, Azusa, California

Other popular photo sources include Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr, Google Images (thousands of Little Free Library-related photos, often with links to their sources but few details), local Little Free Library Facebook pages, and blogs. To use photos from these sources, contact the original copyright holder for permission.

SECTION 5: Tips and Story Angles

Thousands of stories have been published and broadcast about Little Free Libraries around the world. Read a selection of notable stories about the Little Free Library movement.

The most often quoted benefits of Little Free Libraries

  • People meet more neighbors and passers-by than they have in years.
  • Children, youth, and adults of all ages and backgrounds can share in the give and take. People of widely diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds participate in this grassroots effort.
  • Many public and school librarians support the concept and role of Little Free Libraries as outreach tools for reading motivation.
  • People like giving as much as—or perhaps even more than—taking books. Little Free Libraries are likely to have a positive influence on community quality of life and social capital.
  • Small, local business owners report that Little Free Libraries help them attract and keep customers.
  • Realtors have said that Libraries (big and small) have influenced potential home buyers to decide to settle on one neighborhood rather than another.

New aspects of the Little Free Library movement

  • Little Free Library’s Impact Library Program brings Little Libraries full of books where they’re needed most.
  • Launched in 2017, our Action Book Club combines reading with social engagement and now encompasses 1,000 participating groups.
  • Our Kids, Community & Cops Program helps law enforcement and civic groups create positive interactions with youth.
  • Designers, craftsmen and women, architects and artists are creating a new American folk craft by building Little Free Libraries.
  • Little Libraries are becoming destinations…for bike and walking tours, family automobile tours of small towns, and geocachers.
  • The Libraries function as educational and outreach tools for civic engagement, social, and environmental issues.
  • They also serve as unique channels through which publishers and authors can distribute their books.
  • Local and national organizations and corporations increasingly see Little Free Libraries as good investments to demonstrate corporate social responsibility and do their part for their constituents, neighbors, and customers.

For press inquiries please Contact Us.

Pin It on Pinterest